Pages: [1] 2
  Print  
Author Topic: How to find Sinhala names of Birds of Sri Lanka  (Read 11070 times)
Priyanjan
Guest
« on: January 15, 2009, 07:07:02 AM »

Hi All,

The book that was recommended by Mithila (in the Book Review)  titled ‘Sri Lanka Kurullo’ by Prof. S. Kotagama could not be found!

My son has now got the book (that was recommended by Mohammed) titled 'A Photographic Guide to Birds of Sri Lanka' By Gehan ........., Deepal........... & T.S.U. .......
It was in fact a presented to my son by a friend of ours (what a good fellow he is). As indicated by Kelum in his post, my friend had bought the book from Rohan’s Book Shop. It had cost him Rs.500/-. (At least that’s what he told me) and it’s a reprint (2003) of the year 2000 version.

Now I have a new problem. The book is in English and my son does not seem to be interested in ‘learning’ the English name of the birds. He asks me for the Sinhala name and I am clueless.

Tell me, is this same book available in Sinhala? If not what are your suggestions. (Please don’t suggest that I should learn the Sinhala name.)

Thanks,

Priyanjan.
Logged
HoneyBee
Global Moderator
Full Member
***
Posts: 133



View Profile WWW
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2009, 12:27:33 PM »

Dear Priyanjan,

To the best of my knowledge, for Sinhala names Prof. Kotagama's books are the best (perhaps the only ones) which deals with the Sinhalese names of birds. Further I have not come across the Sinhalese version of the book you mentioned.
But there's a small help I can do. I extracted names of 83 species of birds recorded at University of Moratuwa from a short report made by Himesh Jayasinghe, Ramzan Rafeek and My self in 2005. It is uploaded at rapidshare and you may find the link below:

http://lakdasun.com/forum/doc_base/List_of_birds_recorded_at_University_of_Moratuwa_in_2005.pdf

The Sinhala names here are obtained by the book "A field guide to the birds of Sri Lanka by Kotagama,S. & Fernando, P. (1994)"
Follow the steps below to download the file;
  • Click on the link above
  • click on the "free user" button
  • Wait for the countdouwn on the screen (60 sec approx.) then you will see the download button

Well, I think it might have the names of most of the common species. Anyway will try my best to update this list with sinhala names of more birds...
Hope it would help you for the moment...

cheers!
« Last Edit: January 20, 2009, 08:13:11 AM by lakdasun » Logged

EZZAN | Bee Natural...
Mohammed
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 64



View Profile WWW
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2009, 10:13:10 PM »

'A Photographic Guide to Birds of Sri Lanka' By Gehan ........., Deepal........... & T.S.U. .......

The book is in English and my son does not seem to be interested in ‘learning’ the English name of the birds. He asks me for the Sinhala name and I am clueless.

Tell me, is this same book available in Sinhala?

Prijanjan, you raise an important point here. I too use the above guide book and have missed having the sinhala names in this book.

Although I mostly read and follow birding in English the sinhala names are very important for birding in Sri Lanka. Especially when one is travelling around the country and one speaks to villagers etc it is difficult to relate without the sinhala names. So often I have have asked someone about a particular bird in their area but did not know the sinhala name and as a result they don't understand me. It is surprising how well aware our village folk are on birds however they do mostly identify and discuss in sinhala, perhaps tamil also in tamil speaking areas.

I also have the "Bird Sounds of Sri Lanka" CD by Deepal Warakagoda and luckily this has the sinhala names also alongside the English so I use this list to translate the names sometimes.

Regards
Mohammed
 
Logged
Priyanjan
Guest
« Reply #3 on: January 15, 2009, 10:38:21 PM »

HoneyBee,

Thanks a million (an more). I will write the Sinhala names alongside the picture of the bird/s in the book. During the past few days I had so many questions to answer.This is like 'Freedom'.

Thanks again,

Priyanjan.
« Last Edit: January 15, 2009, 10:40:35 PM by Priyanjan » Logged
Priyanjan
Guest
« Reply #4 on: January 15, 2009, 10:47:04 PM »

Mohammed,

Thanks for your responce. The details posted by HoneyBee will really help my son to get on with bird watching. It will also help me as I wil have lesser questions to answer. I read about this CD before. But, I feel that it would be a ittle bit too much for my Jr. He has just started and I don't want him to 'get lost in it' just now.

Anyway, thanks again.

Priyanjan.
Logged
Thilina de Silva
Newbie
*
Posts: 1


View Profile
« Reply #5 on: January 15, 2009, 11:31:25 PM »

Hi,

I would very much appriciate if someone will be kind enough to recommend a book / books that would give details of birds inSri Lanka. I am in fract not a bird enthusiast but this book is for my son who seems to be developing a liking to the subject.

Thanks in advance.

Priyanjan
Hello,
Now only I happened to see your request. You might have bought your son a guide by now...but I thought of making a small
suggestion that might help your son learn the very basics of Sri Lankan birds.
1. "A Guide to The Birds of Sri Lanka" by G. M. Henry.
2. "A Guide to The Birds of Sri Lanka" by John Harrison.
The former is regarded as the 'bible' of local birders and the latter is undoubtedly the best field guide illustrating almost all the
birds found in Sri Lanka.
If your son is in need of further info I'd be glad to help. My e mail address is nethmin999@mail.com.   
Logged
Priyanjan
Guest
« Reply #6 on: January 15, 2009, 11:58:27 PM »

Hello Thilina,

Thanks for the information and offer. Yes, my son has got a book now, details of which I have posted in previous posts (above). You see he is just a 'starter' and the book he has got now suits his requirement. The only problem was that the book is in English & my son is more interested in finding out the name/s of the bird/s in Sinala rather than in English. Once again one of the guys in this forum (namely HoneyBee) came to my assistance in solving the matter to a great extent.

Thanks again for your offer.

Priyanjan.
Logged
Mohammed
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 64



View Profile WWW
« Reply #7 on: January 16, 2009, 12:20:17 PM »

Dear Priyanjan,

To the best of my knowledge, for Sinhala names Prof. Kotagama's books are the best (perhaps the only ones) which deals with the Sinhalese names of birds. Further I have not come across the Sinhalese version of the book you mentioned.
But there's a small help I can do. I extracted names of 83 species of birds recorded at University of Moratuwa from a short report made by Himesh Jayasinghe, Ramzan Rafeek and My self in 2005. It is uploaded at rapidshare and you may find the link below:

http://rapidshare.com/files/183853155/List_of_birds_recorded_at_University_of_Moratuwa_in_2005.pdf.html

The Sinhala names here are obtained by the book "A field guide to the birds of Sri Lanka by Kotagama,S. & Fernando, P. (1994)"
Follow the steps below to download the file;
  • Click on the link above
  • click on the "free user" button
  • Wait for the countdouwn on the screen (60 sec approx.) then you will see the download button

Well, I think it might have the names of most of the common species. Anyway will try my best to update this list with sinhala names of more birds...
Hope it would help you for the moment...

cheers!

Thanks for that list, very useful.

Must tr an add on more names for future, especially all the endemics.

Any idea what they call the following

Ceylon Frogmouth, Sri Lanka Spurfowl, Green Billed Coucal, Sri Lanka Hanging Parrot (Lorikeet)?
Logged
HoneyBee
Global Moderator
Full Member
***
Posts: 133



View Profile WWW
« Reply #8 on: January 16, 2009, 09:48:43 PM »

Hi Mohammed,

Sorry I can't remember the name of Frogmouth. But the others are as follows;
  • Sri Lanka Spurfowl - Haban Kukula
  • Green Billed Coucal - Bata Eti kukula
  • Sri Lanka Hanging Parrot (Lorikeet) - Giraa Maliththaa


Logged

EZZAN | Bee Natural...
Priyanjan
Guest
« Reply #9 on: January 16, 2009, 10:10:33 PM »

Hello Mohammed,

I was just checking out a link that HoneyBee had provided in one of his previous posts. One of the documents in it has details of all the  birds endemic to Sri Lanka. What is interesting is that it gives the common name (in English), the 'scientific' name (if that's the correct term), The name in Sinhala and in Tamil of each bird.

The link is given below. I copied it from HoneyBee's post.
http://www.jetwingeco.com/index.cfm?mid=6&id=57&sid=57&iid=6&section=freedown&list=0

I am sure it will be useful.

Thanks,

Priyanjan.
Logged
HoneyBee
Global Moderator
Full Member
***
Posts: 133



View Profile WWW
« Reply #10 on: January 16, 2009, 11:24:50 PM »

Hi again,

Wel, well .... How come we have missed all the stuff? Priyanjan, Thank you very much for pointing it out. Further (Priyanjan, if you haven't noticed...) the pdf file in the name "Birds of Sri Lanka and Southern India" which is also available in the same web page, has the Sinhala names of most of the birds found in Sri Lanka...

Mithila ayya, Sajani, Gala and Kelum pls ignore the messege I sent  Wink

Happy Birding....
« Last Edit: January 17, 2009, 02:56:10 AM by HoneyBee » Logged

EZZAN | Bee Natural...
Priyanjan
Guest
« Reply #11 on: January 17, 2009, 05:37:36 AM »

Thanks HoneyBee,

You see this bird watching thing was my son's idea. I had no choice but to help him out. It seems like I too have been spending some time in this matter. I really don't want to be too involved in the subject. But for about a little more than a week now, this 'Kottoruwa' fellow (I did a little reference work and I guess the name is 'Pita Rathu Rath Kearala') has been carving out a 'benaya' on the trunk of a dead Kithul tree and I cant resist watching the fellow at it. In fact there are two of them at the task. They take turns and also take the trouble to deliver food to the one at the job. Guess they are a loving couple! But, the interesting thing is that a 'Myna' fello has also been checking out the progress on a daily basis. May be this couple should watch 'Woody Woodpecker' (cartoons) and learn a few mischievous tricks!

Birding!

Priyanjan.
Logged
mithila
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1135


@ N: 06° 47.85’ | E: 079° 53.38’


View Profile WWW
« Reply #12 on: January 18, 2009, 06:51:37 AM »

Priyanjan, that is a very good observation. "Mynas" use abandoned woodpecker made cavities for nesting. The one who is visiting the "construction site" at your place may be planing on using the cavity once the woodpecker abandon it.

You seem to have the right qualities required to be a good birdwatcher. The nesting behavior you have observed is exactly what you will find in any bird guide or field guide. Not just this specie of woodpeckers, but almost every woodpecker will demonstrate a similar nesting behavior. 

See the wikipedia description of nesting behavior

"All members of the family Picidae nest in cavities. Almost every species nests in tree cavities, although in deserts some species nest inside holes in cactus and a few species nest in holes dug into the earth. Woodpeckers and piculets will excavate their own nests, but wrynecks will not. The excavated nest is usually only lined from the wood chips produced as the hole was made. Many species of woodpeckers excavate one hole per breeding season, sometimes after multiple attempts. It takes around a month to finish the job. Abandoned holes are used by many other birds and mammals which are secondary cavity nesters.[5]

Members of Picidae are typically monogamous. A pair will work together to help build the nest, incubate the eggs and raise their altricial young. However, in most species the male does most of the nest excavation and takes the night shift while incubating the eggs. A nest will usually consist of 2-5 round white eggs. Since these birds are cavity nesters their eggs do not need to be camouflaged and the white colour helps the parents to see them in dim light. The eggs are incubated for about 11-14 days before the chicks are born. It takes about 18-30 days before the young are ready to leave the nest."



So next time if you see another bird demonstrating a similar behavior you can suspect that it may be some kind of a "woodpecker". Then you should try to observe its shape, color , special feature (if any), the habitat etc and refer a field guide to quickly identify the new specie.

This is how all bird watchers identify birds. Carefully obeserve the known species, compare them to the unknown. There are exceptions but it works most of the time.

by the way, The woodpeckers are known as "Kerela" in Sinhalese. The "Kottoruwa" in sinhalese refer to the birds known as "Barbets".  For an example

Brown Headed barbet - Polos Kottoruwa
Yellow fronted barbet - ran nalal kottoruwa

« Last Edit: January 18, 2009, 07:03:21 AM by mithila » Logged

Man did not weave the web of life. He is merely a strand in it. Whatever he does to the web of life, he does to himself. | Study nature, love nature, stay close to nature. It will never fail you!
HoneyBee
Global Moderator
Full Member
***
Posts: 133



View Profile WWW
« Reply #13 on: January 18, 2009, 07:21:00 AM »

Wow!!! Shocked
 Great observation (Priyanjan) and Explaination (Mithila). A lot we learn from the forum!!! (kind of Virtual Birding  Smiley)
Logged

EZZAN | Bee Natural...
Priyanjan
Guest
« Reply #14 on: January 18, 2009, 07:29:55 AM »

Mithila,

Thanks a lot for the comments, information and the encouragement. I feel that I am getting into liking the 'subject'. It seems to be quite interesting and ofcourse time consuming. Anyway, for some reason or the other I know that I will not be too serious at it. I will enjoy if at this 'level'.

By the way, I have been taking a few photographs of the 'happenings'. Let's see how long this goes for and then I'll post a few photographs. Need to check out how thats done.

Thanks again,

Priyanjan.
Logged
Lakdasun Forum - Online Home of Sri Lanka's Nature Lovers, Eco-Travelers and Conservationists
   

 Logged
Tags:
Pages: [1] 2
  Print  
 
Jump to: