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Author Topic: Most venemous snakes in Sri Lanka  (Read 60901 times)
mithila
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« on: July 13, 2008, 09:07:23 AM »

The following venomous snakes are responsible for a high incidence of snakebite morbidity and mortality in Sri Lanka:

Cobra (Naja naja) - Sinhala -Naya,

Common krait (Bungarus caeruleus) - Sinhala - Magamaruwa, Thel Karawala,

Sri Lanka krait (Bungarus ceylonicus) - Sinhala -  Mudu Karawala,

Russells's viper (Daboia russelii) - Sinhala - Thith Polanga,

Saw scale viper (Echis carinatus) - Sinahal - weli Polanga,

Hump nose viper (Hypnale hypnale) - Polon Thelissa or Kunakatuwa,

Green pit viper (Trimeresurus trigonocephalus) - Sinahal - Pala Polanga,

and approximately the 13 species of marine snakes which inhabit the coastal waters and estuaries around the island.
« Last Edit: August 04, 2008, 10:16:26 AM by lakdasun » Logged

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Gihan
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« Reply #1 on: July 13, 2008, 09:40:35 AM »

Very useful. Thanks  Smiley
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Asanke
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« Reply #2 on: July 14, 2008, 05:50:08 AM »

Thanks. So these are the "highly venomous" snakes in the country...... There is another list of  "less venomous" (Not sure if this the right word) snakes as well. right?
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Ranishka
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« Reply #3 on: July 14, 2008, 07:59:15 AM »

Very usefull list, Thanks Mithila.

Ranishka
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mithila
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« Reply #4 on: July 14, 2008, 07:25:34 PM »


There are snakes with venom and snakes with no venom. Among the ones with venom, the strength of it varies quite drastically from one specie to another. The list I gave is the ones which are responsible for most number of human deaths. As you said there are other snakes with venom which is not strong enough to kill a grown human begin. Having said that it all depends on how the body react to the venom. Sometimes it is possible for a person to face severe complications when bitten by a even "less venomous" snake but this is quite rare (remember even a bee-sting can kill a person if the body over-react to the chemical injected) .

So if you encounter a snake, the best thing is to stay away and let it go. Most snakes are "harmless".
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Namal
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« Reply #5 on: July 18, 2008, 01:33:43 AM »

I'm pretty sure that the green pit viper is "NOT" poisonious
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mithila
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« Reply #6 on: July 18, 2008, 02:25:33 AM »

Namal,

From what I have read, all Pit Vipers belonging to the "Trimeresurus" genus are poisonous. The endemic Sri Lankan green pitviper(Trimeresurus trigonocephalus) is no exception. The venom of these vipers are primarily hemotoxic (attack red blood cells). The process by which a hemotoxin causes death is much slower than that of a neurotoxin (for an example Venoum of a Krait) so this can be rated "Less Venonous" than some of the other species.

Again I have read that even though the number of reported fatalities is very low in Sri Lanka (may be nill) the green pit vipor's Venom is quite potent and occasionally can prove fatal. Therefore immediate treatment and medical assistance is recommended.
« Last Edit: July 18, 2008, 04:53:40 AM by mithila » Logged

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« Reply #7 on: July 18, 2008, 04:07:15 AM »

Thank you for the useful info... specially abouth the green pit viper. I did't know it has that amount of potential. So will be extra careful next time wen we see....

Actually it was not in himesh (kurullas) list of poisonous snakes either, for the best of my knowledge. Anyway interesting...
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Ranishka
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« Reply #8 on: July 18, 2008, 09:21:13 AM »

I also had the same idea that green pit viper is non venomous.
But I think Mithila is correct, read this research paper by some Thailand experts. They discuss about the behavior of green pit viper venom.

Ranishka

* 2006-3-5.pdf (89.45 KB - downloaded 118 times.)
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mithila
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« Reply #9 on: July 18, 2008, 09:56:02 AM »

Ranishka,

The Green Pit Viper found in Sri Lanka is endemic but I think it is closely related to the ones found in Thailand which is covered in this survey.

Mithila

 
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« Reply #10 on: July 19, 2008, 07:07:21 AM »

Yes, you are right Mithila. I posted that paper because they are close relatives.

Ranishka
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Namal
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« Reply #11 on: July 21, 2008, 04:41:13 AM »

I have seen a guy getting bitterned by a green pit viper and he had no ill effect except for a slight swelling. Based on this I feareless handle them.  Huh Maybe I was just lucky and better keep my distance Smiley
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Namal
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« Reply #12 on: July 21, 2008, 07:39:42 PM »

Guys,

I think I'm still right. I checked with some experts and the told me its moderately venomous, can thus cause harm but cann't kill. Will check up on Anslem book tonight, and clarrify
cheers
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mithila
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« Reply #13 on: July 29, 2008, 01:01:05 AM »

Namal,

I think you are right. I checked Dr Anslem's book and her describes the green pit viper as venomous but says that no human fatalities have been reported even though there had been reported incidents of bites. I thinks till its better to be very careful in handling all those pit vipers, specially when we get really close to them for that "Perfect Closeup"  Smiley

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« Reply #14 on: August 04, 2008, 07:46:42 PM »

There are fatalities caused by the sea snakes?? But i thought their fangs are too deep inside and normal strike would not go in to the fangs:S
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